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Saturday, 15 November 2014

Is that my Author voice or a distant British relative?

First of all I'm not sure if "Author Voice" is the correct term but I'm sticking with it. I call my author voice the sound, feel and personality of my novels main characters. The issue I am having is that my Author voice varies greatly to my real life voice.

My real life voice is strong, bossy, funny (so I'm told) and usually pretty inappropriate. I don't have a stuck up bone in my body and I fit in with men telling crude jokes and with women who love a good bitch session. Yes, I know... I need help, please send some (oh and chocolate). Here is the issue.. My author voice tends to be an 80 year old, wealthy, British Grandmother. I am having a great deal of difficulty getting my personality on paper and I'm blaming everyone!!!

First of all I blame Enid Blyton. I grew up reading the folk of the faraway tree and the wishing chair and I freaking loved them. They were like little worlds hiding within my bedroom that no one knew about but me. I would read them over and over and over. I even had a little rocking chair that I would sit in while I read and I would keep looking down to see if it had sprouted wings yet. I really wanted to name my children Dick and Fanny like the books because it was the funniest thing I had ever heard. They are thankful I changed my mind (I'm still a little disappointed to be honest.. Scott and Tahlia are such boring names by comparison)

Then I blame.. well pretty much everyone. I live in Australia but 90% of the stuff I watch on television is American.Most of the books I read turn out to be American or British Authors also (not intentionally, it just happens that way) So when I want my main character to go to the stinky old train station that smells like cat pee, she actually goes to the subway. I'm sorry but doesn't subway just make sandwiches? (That's the other thing we call them rolls.. a sandwich is made with bread not buns or rolls). Maybe my fingers are American and that's why they happily type away, using American lingo without my consent! now excuse me while I go and snack on some candy ARGHH lollies.

My third issue is my constant need to make my main characters coffee drinkers and wine drinkers. What is that all about? I don't drink either! I drink coca-cola morning, noon and night. Why do my characters never cuddle up on the sofa (oops lounge) and drink a coke? Why do they never meet for a coke with their friends?

Oh and the final issue is that my main character is always a drop dead stunner. She never has lumps of fat where they don't belong, she never has a tooth that has been knocked out or a scar where her third nipple used to be and i need to ask myself why not? No one is perfect in real life. Maybe I realise my own quirky weirdness is just not marketable because everyone, like me, is used to the norm and somewhat expect it. So my main characters for now remain with the looks of a movie star and the attitude of Mary Poppins.

Ps No offense intended to Americans or people with three nipples and especially not to Americans with a third nipple.

12 comments:

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    1. Phew I'm so glad of that. Haha Not meant in an offensive way, I love Americans (well most) :)

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  2. My third nipple takes no offense either haha

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  3. I don't think you should fight your "80 year old granny" voice. Books are a way for people to escape. To imagine themselves as someone else. If it's fun for you to write about, the reader will feel that and ultimately connect better with the story!

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    1. That's a really good suggestion I hadn't thought about it like that before. 80 year old granny here i come haha

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  4. I don't really think it's a problem to write in a voice that isn't your own. Sometimes it make you even more creative since you aren't sticking to your norm. But the fact that your characters are flawless can be good or bad. Many people want to read about perfect people so they can imagine themselves as that. But some of the most interesting books I've ever read have had characters who aren't perfect.

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    1. Also a very good point Hannah. I seem to either go for extremely flawed for the villain or perfect for the hero.. i need to work at the in between.

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  5. Haha. Love it. (Said with a British accent)

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    1. haha I hear it in British as well.

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